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Dana-Farber Cancer Institute receives a grant from the Richard K. Lubin Family Foundation to establish the Lubin Family Foundation Scholar Awards

Dana-Farber Cancer Institute receives a grant from the Richard K. Lubin Family Foundation to establish the Lubin Family Foundation Scholar Awards

The Richard K. Lubin Family Foundation is making a grant to establish the Lubin Family Foundation Scholar Awards at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute. The grant will create new scholar awards open to early career physician-scientists in the greater Boston area as they launch their research careers. The Lubin Scholars will receive a four-year financial award of $150,000 per year and work under the tutelage of a Lubin Scholar Mentor to help guide them during this pivotal time in their early career. Four Lubin Scholars will be selected annually. The purpose of the program is to help retain the brightest physician-scientists in...

The Richard K. Lubin Family Foundation is making a grant to establish the Lubin Family Foundation Scholar Awards at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute.

The grant will create new scholar awards open to early career physician-scientists in the greater Boston area as they launch their research careers. The Lubin Scholars will receive a four-year financial award of $150,000 per year and work under the tutelage of a Lubin Scholar Mentor to help guide them during this pivotal time in their early career. Four Lubin Scholars will be selected annually. The purpose of the program is to help retain the brightest physician-scientists in academic research.

William G. Kaelin Jr., MD, a 2019 Nobel Prize recipient and Dana-Farber researcher, will serve as the Lubin Scholar Awards’ Scientific Director. Candidates will be invited to apply from Dana-Farber/Harvard Cancer Center institutions (Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston Children’s Hospital, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, and Massachusetts General Hospital) and Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT).

Many studies have shown that physician-scientists leave academic research early in their careers for a number of reasons, including financial limitations and more opportunities in the private sector. Surmounting these formidable barriers to retention in academic research is critical to the future of Dana-Farber’s research enterprise and to the broader community of academic medical centers. The Lubin Family Foundation Scholar Awards will create new avenues for early career physician-scientists to reach professional and financial stability within the field of academic research.

The Richard K. Lubin Family Foundation, whose Board consists of Richard (Dana-Farber Trustee) and Nancy Lubin, Kate Lubin and Glen Sutton, and Emily and Greg Woods, have been long-time supporters of Dana-Farber.

“We are deeply grateful to the Lubin family for their continued partnership with Dana-Farber, especially for their generous support of our world-class faculty. The innovative Lubin Family Foundation Scholar Awards set an inspiring example for how we encourage physician-scientists and early career investigators to continue their promising research—by providing them with crucial mentoring and financial resources at a pivotal stage in their careers. These prestigious awards will not only help scientists in the field today, but also create a pipeline and support system for future talent who will someday drive the next major breakthroughs and change the landscape of cancer care as we know it,” said Laurie H. Glimcher, MD, President and CEO of Dana-Farber and the Richard and Susan Smith Professor of Medicine.

Lubin Scholars will be among the most promising early career investigators who are pursuing cancer-relevant basic or translational laboratory-based research and who have demonstrated potential to become the next generation of leaders in cancer research. The selection of Lubin Scholars will focus primarily on those working in fundamental science because many of today’s most important advances in cancer can trace their origins back to research of the basic principles of biology and chemistry.

“I have tremendous admiration for Dana-Farber and respect for its commitment to training the future leaders who will shape the field of oncology. I am pleased that our Foundation has been able to work with the Institute to bring to fruition an award that will help the next generations of scientists succeed in their academic research careers,” said Richard Lubin.

“I know from experience that mentoring colleagues early in their careers has a positive impact on scientific research. Certainly, mentorship combined with a financial award will be incredibly beneficial to young scientists, and these new awards will assure that early career researchers can remain focused on their science and scientific training during their critical transition to independence,” said Kaelin. “I am grateful to the Richard K. Lubin Family Foundation for its vision and commitment in establishing these important and innovative awards.”

The first cohort of Lubin Scholars will be announced on October 3, 2022, and annually thereafter in the fall.

This grant is another example of the Lubin family’s legacy and support for Dana-Farber’s faculty, including a gift in 2018 to establish the Richard and Nancy Lubin Family Chair at Dana-Farber and the Richard and Nancy Lubin Research Fund.

This commitment also supports The Dana-Farber Campaign, the Institute’s ongoing and ambitious, multi-year $2 billion fundraising effort to prevent, treat, and defy cancer by accelerating revolutionary science, extraordinary care, exceptional expertise, and essential opportunities. Richard Lubin serves on The Dana-Farber Campaign Cabinet.

About Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

Dana-Farber Cancer Institute is one of the world’s leading centers of cancer research and treatment. Dana-Farber’s mission is to reduce the burden of cancer through scientific inquiry, clinical care, education, community engagement, and advocacy. Dana-Farber is a federally designated Comprehensive Cancer Center and a teaching affiliate of Harvard Medical School.

We provide the latest treatments in cancer for adults through Dana-Farber Brigham Cancer Center and for children through Dana-Farber/Boston Children’s Cancer and Blood Disorders Center. Dana-Farber is the only hospital nationwide with a top 5 U.S. News & World Report Best Cancer Hospital ranking in both adult and pediatric care.

As a global leader in oncology, Dana-Farber is dedicated to a unique and equal balance between cancer research and care, translating the results of discovery into new treatments for patients locally and around the world, offering more than 1,100 clinical trials.

About the Richard K. Lubin Family Foundation

Established in 1986 in Massachusetts, the Richard K. Lubin Family Foundation is dedicated to improving the quality of life in the Greater Boston Region, through its focus on educational pathways and outcomes, culture and the arts, and medical research and clinical care. The Foundation is proud to launch the Lubin Family Foundation Scholar Awards—four-year awards that couple enhanced mentoring with financial assistance—with the goal of keeping the most promising physician-scientists in academic research as they complete their training and transition to tenure-track faculty positions.

Dana-Farber Cancer Institute receives $11M to intercept and cure deadly cancers

Dana-Farber Cancer Institute receives $11M to intercept and cure deadly cancers

Dana-Farber Cancer Institute announced today it was awarded more than $11 million in grants to intercept cancer at the earliest stages and find cures to several of the deadliest cancers including pancreatic and ovarian cancers, and glioblastoma (GBM) — diseases with poor prognoses in which progress has been slow. This work is funded by Break Through Cancer and is a part of $50 million in grants being made to teams across five cancer research centers: Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center at Johns Hopkins, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Koch Institute for Integrative Cancer Research at MIT, and...

Dana-Farber Cancer Institute announced today it was awarded more than $11 million in grants to intercept cancer at the earliest stages and find cures to several of the deadliest cancers including pancreatic and ovarian cancers, and glioblastoma (GBM) — diseases with poor prognoses in which progress has been slow.

This work is funded by Break Through Cancer and is a part of $50 million in grants being made to teams across five cancer research centers: Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center at Johns Hopkins, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Koch Institute for Integrative Cancer Research at MIT, and The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center. This new model for collaboration enables researchers to boldly tackle some of the biggest challenges in cancer. Break Through Cancer’s innovative approach will help overcome conventional barriers to multi-institution teamwork by using streamlined systems and advanced analytics for data sharing in real time.

“Break Through Cancer has created a collaborative research model to accelerate progress in some of the most challenging types of cancer,” said Laurie H. Glimcher, MD, president and CEO of Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, and a member of Break Through Cancer’s Board of Directors. “This unique initiative will allow many of the world’s leading cancer scientists and clinicians to work together seamlessly to drive new discoveries, advance promising new therapies and ultimately deliver improved outcomes for patients.”

All Break Through Cancer-funded projects will employ a model that enables researchers and physicians from each institution to work collaboratively in real time. Additionally, new technology and systems will make data sharing frictionless. Reducing the day-to-day barriers to cross-institutional collaboration such as contract negotiations, data sharing, intellectual property, and rights to authorship will pave the way for faster discoveries.

“Accelerating the pace of discovery requires bringing basic, translational, and clinical investigators together in 'one room,' and Break Through Cancer’s model allows us to do just that,” said Alan D’Andrea, MD Director of Susan F. Smith Center for Women's Cancers and Director of the Center for DNA Damage and Repair at Dana-Farber. “Working collaboratively, we will be tackling several of the most challenging, complex, and lethal cancers and I believe that this work will be transformational to cancer research as a whole.”

Projects have been funded based on their unique cohort of researchers and potentially transformational science. They include:

  • Intercepting Ovarian Cancer
  • Targeting Minimal Residual Disease in Ovarian Cancer
  • Conquering KRAS in Pancreatic Cancer (in partnership with the Lustgarten Foundation)
  • Revolutionizing GBM Drug Development Through Serial Biopsies
Dana-Farber Cancer Institute Celebrates 75th Anniversary

Dana-Farber Cancer Institute Celebrates 75th Anniversary

Commemoration to showcase decades of progress and leadership in cancer care and research Dana-Farber Cancer Institute is launching a year-long celebration of its 75th anniversary to highlight its history and progress in cancer care and transformative cancer research. In marking the notable anniversary, Dana-Farber seeks to recognize the Institute’s many scientific discoveries, advancements in cancer care for patients, and its extraordinary contributions to eradicating cancer in both children and adults. “From the first remissions with chemotherapy in 1947 to the most recent new immunotherapies, Dana-Farber has helped push progress against cancer for patients, everywhere,” said Dana-Farber President and CEO, Laurie H. Glimcher, MD....

Commemoration to showcase decades of progress and leadership in cancer care and research

Dana-Farber Cancer Institute is launching a year-long celebration of its 75th anniversary to highlight its history and progress in cancer care and transformative cancer research. In marking the notable anniversary, Dana-Farber seeks to recognize the Institute’s many scientific discoveries, advancements in cancer care for patients, and its extraordinary contributions to eradicating cancer in both children and adults.

“From the first remissions with chemotherapy in 1947 to the most recent new immunotherapies, Dana-Farber has helped push progress against cancer for patients, everywhere,” said Dana-Farber President and CEO, Laurie H. Glimcher, MD. “We celebrate the rich history this anniversary represents, even as we rededicate ourselves to relieve the burden of cancer in the years ahead.” 

Dana-Farber will celebrate the milestone anniversary throughout 2022 with signage around the Longwood Medical Area, a dedicated web hub, social media content featuring historical moments in Dana-Farber history, a workforce celebration, and other events to be announced throughout the year. Other historical initiatives, include a Voices of History video project to capture thoughts and memories from key figures from Dana-Farber’s history.

Boston Mayor Michelle Wu will also issue a City of Boston Proclamation today, announcing March 30, 2022 as Dana-Farber Cancer Institute Day.

“Our work over many decades has been marked by an incredible community of scientists, clinicians, nurses, staff and volunteers, all working together with our patients and families for the best possible outcome today and tomorrow,” said Josh Bekenstein, chairman of the Board of Trustees. “We are grateful for their efforts and dedication to the mission we all share.”

In 1947, Sidney Farber, MD, founded the Children's Cancer Research Foundation, dedicated to providing compassionate, state-of-the-art treatment to children with cancer while developing the cancer preventatives, treatments, and cures of the future.

The foundation officially expanded its programs to include patients of all ages in 1969, and in 1974 became known as the Sidney Farber Cancer Center in honor of its founder. The long-term support of the Charles A. Dana Foundation was acknowledged by incorporating the Institute under its present name in 1983.

Throughout its history, Dana-Farber researchers and physicians have contributed numerous scientific breakthrough in both the understanding of cancer biology and the treatment of the disease across all types of cancer including:

  • 1954: Farber and his colleagues achieve the first remissions of Wilms' tumor, a common form of childhood cancer, and boost cure rates from 40 percent to 85 percent.
  • 1974 Drs. Emil Frei III and Stephen Sallan start the first in an ongoing series of clinical trials for children diagnosed with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). These trials dramatically improve treatment and play a key role in building toward today's cure rates of 85 to 90 percent.
  • 1996: Institute researchers dramatically advance the understanding of how HIV, the virus that causes AIDS, replicates and infects healthy cells. Science magazine heralds this discovery as its "Breakthrough of the Year".
  • 1998: A drug called imatinib (Gleevec), the early work for which was done at Dana-Farber, achieves striking success in many patients with chronic myelogenous leukemia.
  • 2001: Dana-Farber researchers discover that many cancer cells carry a surface protein called PD-L1, which staves off an attack by immune system T cells. The discovery lays the foundation for immunotherapy drugs.

Over the last decade, Dana-Farber researchers have helped to usher in a new era in personalized cancer treatment using precision medicine, targeted treatments and becoming a world leader in leveraging the human immune system to fight cancer. Advancements have included:

  • Nivolumab (Optivo) becomes the first drug targeting the PD-L1 protein on cancer cells to be approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. The drug, part of a revolution in cancer immunotherapy, derives from research by Dana-Farber scientists.
  • Officials launch Profile, a research program that enables all adult patients treated at the Dana-Farber Brigham Cancer Center to have their tumor tissue scanned for genetic mutations known or suspected of being linked to cancer.
  • A personal cancer treatment vaccine that targets distinctive "neoantigens" on tumor cells can stimulate a potent, safe, and precisely targeted anti-tumor response in patients with melanoma, scientists at Dana-Farber and the Broad Institute report.
  • Following a clinical trial led by Dana-Farber investigators, the S. Food and Drug Administration grants its first approval for CAR T-cell therapy for adults with multiple myeloma.
  • Dana-Farber scientist William Kaelin Jr., MD, is named a co-recipient of the 2019 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine for research into the mechanism by which cells sense and adjust to varying levels of oxygen.
  • Dana-Farber researchers have contributed to the development of 35 of 75 cancer drugs recently approved by the FDA for use in cancer patients.
  • The Institute is internationally renowned for its equal commitment to cutting edge research and provision of excellent patient care.

Dana-Farber Cancer Institute is a principal teaching affiliate of Harvard Medical School, a federally designated Center for AIDS Research, and a founding member of the Dana-Farber/Harvard Cancer Center, a federally designated comprehensive cancer center. Dana-Farber also maintains affiliations with several schools of nursing in the Boston area.

Dana-Farber is supported by the National Cancer Institute, the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, and the generous support of numerous foundations and individuals who contribute to the Institute's individual research and clinic programs or to the Jimmy Fund, the principal charity of the Institute, named for one of its child patients.

For more information on Dana-Farber’s 75th anniversary, visit www.dana-farber.org/75

Paula and Rodger Riney Foundation makes $40 million transformative grant to further multiple myeloma research at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

Paula and Rodger Riney Foundation makes $40 million transformative grant to further multiple myeloma research at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

Paula and Rodger Riney of St. Louis, MO, through the Paula and Rodger Riney Foundation, have announced a $40 million grant to support multiple myeloma research at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute. The grant represents the largest single award supporting multiple myeloma research in Dana-Farber’s history. The Paula and Rodger Riney Foundation has been a strong supporter of Dana-Farber and with this grant has cumulatively donated nearly $60 million to the Institute. Multiple myeloma is a challenging cancer that forms in a type of white blood cell called a plasma cell. Dana-Farber has been at the forefront of multiple myeloma therapies over the past...

Paula and Rodger Riney of St. Louis, MO, through the Paula and Rodger Riney Foundation, have announced a $40 million grant to support multiple myeloma research at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute. The grant represents the largest single award supporting multiple myeloma research in Dana-Farber’s history. The Paula and Rodger Riney Foundation has been a strong supporter of Dana-Farber and with this grant has cumulatively donated nearly $60 million to the Institute.

Multiple myeloma is a challenging cancer that forms in a type of white blood cell called a plasma cell. Dana-Farber has been at the forefront of multiple myeloma therapies over the past two decades, helping to convert myeloma from a fatal disease to a chronic condition for many patients. However, therapeutic resistance and drug-related toxicities continue to take a toll on many patients, underscoring the need for innovative treatments.

“The path to developing new treatments for multiple myeloma is through rigorous research. The most effective way to spur that research is in supporting the scientists doing the complex work. The Riney Family are generous and stalwart supporters, and through this grant and their previous support they continue to make a profound impact on scientific discovery and clinical care. Their leadership will help patients at Dana-Farber and around the world,” said Laurie H. Glimcher, MD, President and CEO of Dana-Farber and the Richard and Susan Smith Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School.

“My own journey as a myeloma patient—and knowing how many others are also living with this disease—has led us to seek out the individuals, teams, and organizations that are on the leading edge of research,” said Rodger Riney. “There is no time to waste in the pursuit of better understanding, treatment, and cures. My family and I feel grateful to be able to support Ken, Paul, and Nikhil and their teams at Dana-Farber who are making incredible inroads. We are humbled by the lifelong dedication that Ken, Paul, and Nikhil bring to myeloma patients suffering from this terrible disease. We hope this gift will inspire others to also support the tremendous work happening every day in Dana-Farber’s labs and clinics.”

This new $40 million grant builds upon ongoing work and will deepen and expand approaches for addressing the most complex challenges in myeloma research and improving patient care. Specifically, this grant will:

  • Renew support for preclinical experiments to identify novel targets and develop new medicines and immune-based therapies for patients;
  • Fund clinical research designed to test novel myeloma therapies, alone and in combination with standard and experimental treatments, to improve patient outcomes; and,
  • Support to co-locate myeloma labs at Dana-Farber to facilitate greater cohesion and collaboration among members of the research team.

“I extend my heartfelt thanks to Paula and Rodger Riney for their unprecedented support of our research to develop novel treatments for multiple myeloma. This very generous grant will fast-forward our translation of basic discoveries to clinical trials, ultimately providing innovative treatments for patients and their families,” said Ken Anderson, MD, program director at Dana-Farber’s Jerome Lipper Multiple Myeloma Center and LeBow Institute for Myeloma Therapeutics and Kraft Family Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School. Anderson will lead the research efforts supported by this grant in close partnership with Nikhil Munshi, MD, director of Basic and Correlative Science at the Jerome Lipper Multiple Myeloma Center and Kraft Family Chair at Dana-Farber. The grant will also provide support for clinical work led by Paul Richardson, MD, clinical program leader and director of clinical research at the Jerome Lipper Multiple Myeloma Center and RJ Corman Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School.

The Rineys have a strong legacy of supporting multiple myeloma research at Dana-Farber and in 2019 gave a $16.5 million gift to establish the Riney Family Multiple Myeloma Initiative, which has driven groundbreaking research in record time. Examples of recent discoveries by Dana-Farber investigators include:

  • Bringing therapeutic antibodies, which help immune cells find and attack tumors, to patients with multiple myeloma.
  • Leading clinical studies demonstrating the remarkable therapeutic effects of CAR T-cells that have been engineered to target multiple myeloma.
  • Setting the stage for the development of innovative therapies that exploit the unique vulnerabilities of multiple myeloma cells.

Over the past two years, the Paula and Rodger Riney Foundation also made gifts totaling $2.6 million to establish the Riney Family Fund for COVID-19 and Multiple Myeloma Research at Dana-Farber, under Richardson’s direction.

These commitments provide powerful momentum for The Dana-Farber Campaign, an ambitious multi-year $2 billion fundraising effort to prevent, treat, and defy cancer by accelerating revolutionary science, extraordinary care, exceptional expertise, and essential opportunities.

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